Tag Archives: osteopenia

MY VITAMIN RECOMMENDATIONS FOR SPECIFIC CONDITIONS

balloonsAs most of you know, I am not a huge proponent of vitamins, based on concerns about the potential negatives they can cause,  as well as the lack of evidence for their general effectiveness.

That said, there are situations in which vitamins can be considered and here is a list of my current recommendations, with particular brands mentioned (that are known to be of high quality.  Other brands may be fine, but these are the ones I am comfortable with.)

Bones (documented osteoporosis with added Vitamin D required.)

Natural Factors Vitamin D3 (1000, 2000, 5000 unit capsules)

Calcium Citrate…..Citrical Brand (all varieties)

 

Memory Loss (ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE):

Nature Made Vitamin E 1000 unit capsules, 2 daily

B Vitamins (folic acid & B-12) in the form of Xymogen Methyl Protect, 1 daily (we have this at our office)

 

Fatty Liver (ALSO CALLED NASH…NON-ALCOHOLIC STEATOHEPATITIS):

Nature Made Vitamin E 400 units capsules, 2 daily

 

Hair Loss (Alopecia)

Nature Made Biotin 2500mcg

Natural Factors Easy Iron, 20mg tablets, 1-2 daily

 

Iron Deficiency Anemia:

Natural Factors Easy Iron, 20mg tablets, 1-4 daily (easiest on the digestion)

Ferro Sequels (Ferrous Fumarate), slow release iron, 1-4 per day

Iron Sulfate 325mg, 1-3 per day

LET’S CHECK YOUR BONES LESS OFTEN

In a new study from the NEJM (New England Journal of Medicine), women over 65 with normal bones on DEXA (bone mineral scanning), or those with only mild bone loss, can take up to 15 years to get their 2nd bone scan.
Great news!
We have been doing scanning at 2 year intervals and although the radiation involved is very minimal, it is a costly procedure. Doing it less often will not miss many women at risk of developing osteoporosis.
I’ve been increasing the interval between bone scans for such woman, but now it’s good to have data to support that. That said, not sure we will wait 15 years…but rather 5-10 to do our second scan.
As always, it’s important to discuss this directly with the doctor, to understand the pro’s and con’s of monitoring, but it’s nice to get such reassuring information on woman at ‘low risk’.